Posts in Lent 2019: Lost and Found
Lent: Holy Week 

Jesus was inviting us to embrace a new way of living that would include many deaths along our path in search of our true selves, where our ego, or our need for control, or to be right, or to know, is slowly put to death. His death showed us that we can die, and his resurrection that we can live.

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Lent: Personal crisis and self-realisation

The early stage of lostness reveals itself in a type of dis-ease with life as we know it. The younger son, according to cultural norms, had no right to demand his inheritance but the fathers willingness to comply suggests something bigger going on behind the scenes. Was all not well in Prodigalville? The claustrophobic nature of these feelings eventually push us toward escapism, the need to abscond from that which seemingly traps and restricts our lives. Our impatience with our maturation is often seen in our youthful rebellion as we push the boundaries and revolt against the powers that be.

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Lent: Letting go of the chase

The disciples are tempted, as so many of us are, to take whatever system is in front of us, be it religious, political, or economic, and figure out how to use it to our advantage. To feed the drive of the ego. We are so often at the centre of our own story, jostling for position. Maybe it’s not as overt as these two brothers, but a lot of the ways we structure our society is designed to help us feed the ego, to acquire more status and more influence. The challenge of Jesus is that the pathway to life and to the kingdom of God, is found in the giving up of our chasing status, power, influence and success in favour of seeing others liberated. 

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Lent: The life found beyond prejudice

The profound shock In the parable of the Good Samaritan is that the ethnic and religious other is the one who shows compassion. This story is a pointed way of saying: you need to examine the ethnic and religious prejudice and exclusion that you hold. This needs to change!  Jesus challenges the entire notion of trying to decide who is my neighbour and who isn’t my neighbour. Who is in and who is out. Who is one of “your people” and who isn’t. Jesus exposes the fault in the question itself.

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Lent: The virtues of Cruciformity

Compassion does not see people based on some kind of preferential treatment, its lack of bias and partiality reminds us that it is available to all at any one time. Compassion as a metaphor for God cannot be restrained by our religious or social constructs, lest we become deceived into thinking that the divine has a elite group of people that are favoured more than others. The only people that seem to attract divine favour are those who are at their most vulnerable at any given time.

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Lent: Lost and Found

We cling to things that ultimately do not give us the meaning and fulfilment that we crave. We think that ‘having’ or ‘getting’ that thing is what will make us feel happy and satisfied.  But the challenge of Jesus, and our challenge as we enter Lent, is that ‘getting the thing’ is not the ultimate way to this kind of life. It’s the giving up of things for others. For God, and for our neighbour.

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