Posts in Eastertide
Eastertide: Ascension

Jesus as the new face of God brought the God-up-there down to ground level, eventually reconstituting an ancient mystical understanding of the God who is everywhere. The ascension narrative of St Luke (Ch 24) does not ignore or avoid the vertical thinking that dominated peoples’ view of the divine but uses it as a starting point for an enlarged discussion around how we see and understand God.

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Eastertide: ‘Doubting Thomas’ gets a bad rap

We all have doubts, whether we acknowledge them or not. The journey of faith does not build on a foundation of certainty. There is an invitation to trust and to believe, but to trust and believe goes hand in hand with moments of doubt and uncertainty. The idea of trust actually requires doubt and uncertainty, otherwise you don’t need to trust, because you know!

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Eastertide: The Emmaus Road

The Emmaus Road, as an in-between space, is the road that most of us are on, most of the time. We set out on our paths with plans and intentions, hopes and dreams, (shattered and fulfilled), and what happens along the road determines our destination. We might end up in the same ‘physical’ location that we set out to reach, but how we get there will change everything about the way we engage with the destination.  

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Mother Earth

What we believe about God has a direct bearing on how we practice life. If God is good and calls our planet good, then we have responsibility to care. If God is a judge who will eventually set fire to this planet (and start a new one), then we can easily trash her, give God a hand and speed up the process.

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Eastertide: Peter

The Apostle Peter was a curious character. If Mary Magdalene was the faithful, loving and devoted one, then Peter was the reactive hothead who raced around in a whirlwind of his own enthusiasm and then flamed out, spiralling into a pit of shame (before becoming one of the great leaders of the early church of course).

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Eastertide: Mary Magdalene

How often do we identify and define each other, (or ourselves) based on our past? What is it about human nature that loves to ‘dig up the dirt’ on someone else? Can we recognise and remember people for the goodness that lies within  as opposed to the sin? And can we allow, even encourage people to become all they were created to be, accepting and embracing all despite our perceived bias and world view. 

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